Noah’s Ark 13

Posted: July 30, 2015 in Noah's Ark
Tags: , , , , , ,

Fantastic sun rays striking through clouds. Graphic effects are applied for a more dramatic image

This week let’s read about the Siwalik Hills of the Himalayas.  The Himalayas are the highest mountain range in
the world and home of Mount Everest, the world’s highest peak.

Durring the 19th century, the Siwalik Hills revealed fossil evidence of many forms of marine organisms such as fish
and clams.

In the book Earth in Upheavel, written by Immanuel Velikovsky, the following statement is made:

       The Siwalik Hills are so stocked with animals of so many and such varied species that the animal      
       world of today seems impoverished by comparison.  It looks as though all the animals have invaded
       the world at one time.

But how did these marine organisms get to these heights?  The Siwalik Hills are three thousand to four thousand
feet in height.

The flood of Noah’s time explains how the sea life got up to the mountain range.  As the flood waters 
receded, sea life was deposited on mountain levels.

Remember Genesis 7:20  The waters rose and covered the mountains to a depth of more than fifteen
cubits (22.5 feet).

This archaeological site supports the idea of a great flood killing many of the sea animals.  The hot
errupting springs on the ocean floor and the mighty waves killed and scrambled the sea life, deposit- 
ing them high on the Siwalik Hills of the Himalayas. 

Next week we will read about one more fossil site.  A site located in central Burma.

Thank you so much for reading.  God bless.

Jeff

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